Governor and Congressional Delegation

 

All elected officials are very affected by the letters they receive from constituents.  Since most people never bother to write, when you do, it carries great weight.  We are blessed to have a congressional delegation that has been a great help on rail issues and a Governor that is supportive - they deserve your thanks, which will help them continue to understand that this is a priority issue for Vermont.  Here are links for you to offer your comments (the Governor is further down):

Senator Bernie Sanders: http://sanders.senate.gov/comments/
Senator Pat Leahy: http://leahy.senate.gov/contact.cfm
Congressman Peter Welch: http://www.house.gov/formwelch/issue_subscribe.htm

And here are their Vermont offices:

Bernie Sanders
1 Church Street, 2nd Floor
Burlington, Vermont 05401

Pat Leahy
199 Main Street, 4th Floor
Burlington, Vermont 05401

Peter Welch
30 Main Street, Suite 350
Burlington, Vermont 05401

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Governor Peter Shumlin
109 State Street, Pavilion
Montpelier, VT 05609-0101
http://governor.vermont.gov/contact.html

Brian Searles, Transportation Secretary
One National Life Drive
Montpelier, VT 05633-5001

Joe Flynn, Rail Program Manager
One National Life Drive
Montpelier, VT 05633-5001

 

Here's what you can do to stay safe around trains...

Never trespass on any railroad property or right of way!
Doing so is illegal and risks serious injury or death.

Cross only at designated pedestrian or roadway crossings!
Look for a train moving from either direction -- and then look for a second train from either direction.

Always expect a train!
Trains do not have set schedules and can approach from either direction at any time of day or night.
Trains do not take holidays.

Don't stand next to tracks!
Trains can overhang the tracks by three feet on either side, and straps and tiedowns can extend even further.

Never try to beat a train!
Because of their size, you cannot judge a train's speed or distance. Trains cannot make sudden stops. Remember that a locomotive weighs 200 tons. An automobile being hit by a train is equivalent to a soda can being hit by an automobile.

 

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